Thesis Abstract

Daniel P. Skehan, Virtual Training System for Diagnostic Ultrasound. MS Thesis, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, October 2011.

SUMMARY:

A low cost ultrasound training system was developed, which is software based, utilizes a laptop or PC and employs virtual reality concepts. A sham transducer containing 5 degrees of freedom (DoF) tracking sensors is used to scan a curved compliant cylinder segment, representing a body surface, such as the abdominal region. The computer screen displays a virtual subject unique for each image volume, with a virtual transducer moving on the surface of the virtual subject, in concert with the movement of the sham transducer. The displayed ultrasound imaging is a stenciled slice of the 3D image volume, where the stencil is determined by the transducer type and depth setting.

 

Christian J. Banker, Interactive Training System for Medical Ultrasound. MS Thesis, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, January 2009.

SUMMARY:

The goal of this work was to design and implement an interactive training system to help train and evaluate sonographers. The Interactive Training System for Medical Ultrasound is an inexpensive, software-based training system in which the trainee scans a lifelike manikin with a sham transducer containing a 6 degree of freedom tracking sensor. The observed ultrasound image is generated from a pre-stored 3D image volume and is controlled interactively by the sham transducer’s position and orientation.

 

Abraham M. Goldsmith, An Inertial-Optical Tracking System for Quantitative, Freehand, 3D Ultrasound. MS Thesis, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, December 2008.

SUMMARY:

The goal of the work presented here is to create a probe tracking system for freehand 3D ultrasound that does not rely on any fixed frame of reference. This system tracks the ultrasound probe using only sensors integrated to the probe itself. The advantages of such a system are that it requires no setup before it can be used, it is more portable because no extra equipment is required, it is immune from environmental interference, and it is less expensive than external tracking systems.

 

John David Quartararo, Semi-Automated Segmentation of 3D Medical Ultrasound Images. MS Thesis, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, October 2008.

SUMMARY:

In this segmentation study, we specifically targeted simulated cysts, cysts in tissue-mimicking phantoms, and boundaries of prostates, obtained clinically. Segmentation was performed directly in 3D using the level set method, but required manual initialization and was hence semi-automated.  Various pre-processing techniques were explored to find the most robust and accurate segmentation results. Ground-truth models were generated for targets with known geometries, and obtained from medical doctors for the case of clinical human (prostate) data.

 

Brett Dickson, Wireless Communication Options for a Mobile Ultrasound System. MS Thesis, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, August 2008.

SUMMARY:

The goal of this project was to analyze three different wireless communication technologies that could be integrated into the ultrasound system for possible utilization in remote data applications where medical information may be transmitted from the mobile unit to some centralized base station, such as an emergency room or field hospital. By incorporating wireless telecommunication technology into the design, on site medical personnel can be assisted in diagnostic decisions by remote medical experts.